Find more about Weather in Cedar Key, FL
avocet clip art 44244

 

CEDAR KEYS AUDUBON MEMBERS
GREET ANN PAUL
April 25, 2017

Approximately twenty-five Cedar Keys Audubon Chapter members met at the Cedar Key Library on Monday afternoon at 5 pm to hear Ann Paul, Tampa Bay Regional Coordinator for Audubon’s Coastal Islands Sanctuaries.

Co-Presidents Crosby Hunt and Deborah Anderson updated members on the group’s upcoming events.

  • This Saturday’s work day at Homosassa Refuge to rebuild hurricane-damaged grounds.
  • May 19 Sunset Cruise in Cedar Key to watch the birds over Snake and Seahorse Keys.
  • Efforts to work with kayakers to heighten awareness about not disturbing nesting birds.

Paul’s presentation provided a full historical base upon which Audubon Florida was built.   She contextualized Audubon from the 1800s through plume hunting and growing social awareness, to today.  Through the years, Paul stressed, Audubon has nurtured relationships with critical agencies, such as the United States Fish and Wildlife Commission, expanding its conservational strength and influence.

Paul over vied her work at the Florida Coastal Islands Sanctuaries.  The Sanctuaries include water bird nesting and habitat islands in the west central Florida estuaries, including St. Joseph Sound, Clearwater Harbor, Tampa Bay, Sarasota Bay, and north Charlotte Harbor and Estero Bay.  Pelicans, herons, egrets, ibis, spoonbills, storks, oystercatchers, gulls, terns, and skimmers nest on these sites. 

******


THE CEDAR KEY DOLPHIN PROJECT
NEEDS FUNDING

April 25, 2017

Editor’s Note:  Stefanie Gazda, Ph.D. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. has worked in Cedar Key in recent years gathering data on dolphins and regularly updating the public with her findings as part of the Cedar Key Library Lecture Series.   What follows is a note from her in search of funding. Cedar Key News wishes her luck in her efforts.

The Cedar Key Dolphin Project has been doing research on the bottlenose dolphins of the Nature Coast area (mostly Cedar Key) since 2001.  This work is important for many reasons: dolphins are frequently thought of as ocean sentinels, which means that what affects them likely affects humans as well. Having this research continue with little interruption is also important, as it is the only way we can get information on this long lived species.

This summer, I have three goals:

  • To continue my surveys of dolphins in the Cedar Key area.
  • To initial survey Dixie and Taylor counties, which are sites covered by the new Marine Mammal Rescue program at UF. I am the only member of this program with any knowledge of the local dolphin population and the area in general. We know nothing about the dolphin populations in Dixie and Taylor counties at all. We need to determine if surveying the area is even feasible, and then collect baseline data that we can use as the basis of longer term research projects.
  • To assist and to train the Marine Mammal Rescue team members on how to navigate the waters in the area as well as how to collect data in a useable way.

I currently have some funding from the University of Florida, but I do not have enough to sustain a field season.  To that end, I have set up a GoFundMe campaign at https://www.gofundme.com/ckdolphinproject. As of the morning of April 25th I am almost halfway to $2500.00, which will allow us to do research for 4 weeks.  If I can raise $4000.00, we will be able to do research for eight weeks.  Funds will be used for housing, travel, gas, and equipment maintenance.

There is a time limit as well! I need to hit close to my base $2500 goal by April 30th to start setting up the season. I've added some fun benefits for donating for locals.

Thank you for your support!
Stefanie Gazda, Ph.D.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
*****

          

CRITTERS  
APRIL 21, 2017 

 

There are two types of peafowl: blue, originating in India; green, from Myanmar.  However we also see leucitic peafowl which are born with a loss of pigmentation.  They are not albinos, as they retain their eye color.  Males are typically called peacocks;  females are called peahens and young...you guessed it…peachicks.

PHOTOS AND BLURB BY REBECCA GALLAGHER

 APR 21 CRITTER BluePeacockAPR 21 CRITTER WhitePeacock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Look for more CritterS photographs to come. 

Should you have a great photo you wish to share,
please, email it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Staff will post it for others to enjoy.
 
 
 
**********
 
 
 
 

 
avocet clip art 44244

 

CEDAR KEYS AUDUBON PRESENTS
FLORIDA’S COASTAL
 ISLANDS SANCTUARIES
April 11, 2017

Ann Paul, Tampa Bay Regional Coordinator for Audubon’s Coastal Islands Sanctuaries, will present Florida’s Coastal Islands Sanctuaries on Monday April 24, at 5 pm at the Cedar Key Library. 

Paul will present brief history and discuss the current programs and projects of the Florida Coastal Islands Sanctuaries.  The Sanctuaries include water bird nesting and habitat islands in the west central Florida estuaries, including St. Joseph Sound, Clearwater Harbor, Tampa Bay, Sarasota Bay, and north Charlotte Harbor and Estero Bay. 

Pelicans, herons, egrets, ibis, spoonbills, storks, oystercatchers, gulls, terns, and skimmers nest on these sites.  Ann will discuss Sanctuary staff activities to protect the birds from disturbance by boaters and the management of the islands’ habitats.

*****


 

avocet clip art 44244

 

BIRD RESCUE
CEDAR KEYS AUDUBON
April 21, 2017

If you’ve been to Cedar Key recently, chances are you’ve seen them.  Whether you’re fishing at the Big Dock, walking down G Street in search of the perfect sunset, or trolling Dock Street for the best deal on a clam dinner, you will encounter significant signage: “Do Not Feed the Birds,” “Prevent seabird Entanglement ,” “Hooked a Bird? Don’t Cut the line,” and “Injured Bird? Contact one of the volunteers for assistance.”  The signs are a relatively new feature of the Cedar Key fishing and birding community and are an attempt to address an old and familiar (to any who have fished off the main pier regularly) problem: sea birds (mainly pelicans) getting entangled in fishing lines. 

The original idea came from Doug Maple, bird authority and former owner of Captain’s Doug’s Tidewater Tours, who started his own informal bird rescue more than ten years ago.  “They were getting slaughtered down there,” Maple said, “and I was already down there with a boat.”  Doug and, a bit later, Florida biologist Tiffany Black began helping fishermen unhook distressed pelicans and, when necessary, transporting them to veterinary facilities who could provide medical expertise such as the University of Florida Vet School.  He then contacted the on site professional science community, led by the University of Florida IFAS, The Nature Coast Biological Station, and Sea Grant Florida.