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INTRODUCTION TO THE
LONE CABBAGE OYSTER REEF
RESTORATION PROJECT
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 7:00 P.M.
COMMUNITY CENTER, 809 6TH STREET, CEDAR KEY
October 17, 2017

In less than 30 years, 3,000-year-old oyster reefs off Florida’s Big Bend coastline have declined by 88 percent, according to University of Florida/IFAS researchers.  For residents who depend on the fishing grounds and other coastal resources protected by these reefs, it’s a worrying trend.  Now, with an award from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Gulf Environmental Benefit Fund, a UF/IFAS research team will work to restore these shrinking oyster reefs and help coastal ecosystems and economies become more resilient in the face of climate change and rising tides.  The “Recovery and Resilience of Oyster Reefs in the Big Bend of Florida” project will target the Lone Cabbage reef chain in the Suwannee Sound. The UF/IFAS team plans to restore up to 32 acres (encompassing about 3 linear miles) of reef. 

 Peter Frederick, Bill Pine and Leslie Sturmer are the primary investigators for the grant. They will talk about their research, which shows that the decline of oysters in the Big Bend region is due to increasing salinity levels in estuaries, which is where freshwater from rivers mixes with ocean salt water. Oysters need intermediate salinities, and have die-offs as they get stressed by prolonged periods of high salinity.  Oyster reefs are long linear chains, that serve as leaky dams, keeping freshwater near the coast. As oyster reefs die off and lose elevation, more ocean water mixes with fresh, boosting salinity. Reefs made up of dead oysters eventually disintegrate into sandbars. Oysters can’t establish on sand, so the reef can’t regenerate. The UF/IFAS project wants to break this cycle by encouraging new oysters to recolonize areas where reefs have degraded. To do that, researchers will install limestone boulders covered in a layer of oyster and clam shell, materials that readily attract new oysters.

An introduction to the Lone Cabbage Oyster Reef Restoration Project will be held on Thursday, October 26, starting at 7pm, at the Community Center, 809 6th Street, Cedar Key. Frederick, Pine and Sturmer will provide further information on the background of the project, problems with offshore reefs and why they have declined over the past decades, results of the pilot study conducted in 2011-12, and a time line for the new project. A question and answer session will follow over coffee and desserts. For further information about the meeting, contact Leslie Sturmer, with the UF/IFAS Shellfish Extension Program, at 352-543-5057 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To learn more about this project, visit http://www.wec.ufl.edu/oysterproject/.

Sampling oyster reef

 

 

 

Bill Pine, UF/IFAS Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, counts and measures oysters in a one quarter square meter to calculate how many, both alive and dead, are on the Lone Cabbage oyster reef.  

   

 
  
 
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CEDAR KEY HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS
 
 
 
 
CREVASSE P1
 CREVASSE P2
 
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LOGO WGPWITHLACOOCHEE
GULF PRESERVE
October 6
, 2017
 

The following presentation will be hosted at the WGP Education Center on Friday, October 20, 2017 at 10am.

Honey Bees
by
Melody Taylor
Master Beekeeper

Please join us at the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve Education Center on October 20th, at 10am, for a presentation by Florida native and master beekeeper Melody Taylor. Melody will be talking about honey bees, their importance, and recent threats to their survival. We hope to see you there.

The Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve is owned and operated by the Town of Yankeetown and was purchased with funding from the Florida Communities Trust.  The Preserve is located at 1001 Old Rock Road, Yankeetown Florida.  Visit our web site (www.wgpfl.org) for directions and information on upcoming events.

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STATE OF FLORIDA
ACQUIRES 465 ACRES
TO PROTECT
SILVER SPRINGS AND
THE OCKLAWAHA RIVER
Acquisition will protect water quality, benefit water quantity and provide recreational opportunities
October 6, 2017

TALLAHASEE, Fla. – The Florida Department of Environmental Protection has finalized the purchase of 465 acres in Marion County, which was approved by Governor Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet in March.  The $4.5 million acquisition will help maintain the health of Silver Springs, as well as the fish and wildlife species that depend on the springs.  The property is within the Florida's First Magnitude Springs Florida Forever Project and is ranked first in the Florida Forever Partnerships & Regional Incentives Projects category.

“DEP is committed to protecting Florida’s incredible natural resources, such as Silver Springs,” said DEP Secretary Noah Valenstein. "We’re proud that we were able to work with our partners to complete this important acquisition, which will benefit Silver Springs and the Ocklawaha River, and look forward to continuing to build these types of partnerships to acquire additional rare and sensitive lands.”


RAILROADS & RIVERBOATS
ON DISPLAY AT
LEVY COUNTY LIBRARIES
October 5, 2017         

An excursion into the Golden Age of Transportation awaits patrons of the Levy County Public Libraries.  For the next six months, each of the local libraries will have a display of photographs of the railroads and riverboats that plied the waters of the Suwannee River and surrounding waters.         

OCT 5 LCHS RR DISPLAY PIC Steam navigation started on the Suwannee during the 2nd Seminole Indian War (1835-1842) when the vessels were utilized to carry US soldiers to the interior of Florida and bring the captured Seminoles Indians out to the coast for transport west.  Commercial navigation ended when the CITY OF HAWKINSVILLE was abandoned by her last Captain, Mr. Currie, on May 19, 1922.   Today the vessel rests in shallow water on the west bank of the Suwannee River above Old Town.         

Another well known vessel of Suwannee River fame was the MADISON, owned and operated by Captain James Tucker.  Not only did the vessel gain recognition providing the residents of the Suwannee River with much needed supplies, but also served under the Confederacy during the Civil War transporting troops and food stuffs and protecting the river.         

Fifty railroads and riverboats photos, news articles, and train schedules are on display and will eventually make their way through all five of Levy County’s Public Libraries.  The display is courtesy of the Levy County Historical Society, Inc.  Stop in the next time your are in the vicinity of your local library.

CUTLINE: Bronson Library Manager Sandy Moseley points out the picure of the MADISON drawn by local artist Ed Rowe of Bronson to library patrons Felicia Middleton and Shaun Olsen.  Felicia has a soft spot in her heart for the MADISON because her grandfather, who owned a business on the Suwannee at Old Town, convinced her to name her daughter MADISON when she was born.    

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